We found 95 results for Cancer Biology.

Stress May Help Cancer Cells Resist Treatment, Research Shows

Scientists from Wake Forest University School of Medicine are the first to report that the stress hormone epinephrine causes changes in prostate and breast cancer cells that may make them resistant to cell death. “These data imply that emotional stress may contribute to the development of cancer and may also reduce the effectiveness of cancer treatments,” said George Kulik, D.V.M., Ph.D., an assistant professor of cancer biology and senior researcher on the project. The study results are reported on-line in the Journal of Biological Chemistry and will appear in a future print issue.

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Wake Forest Graduate Student Ties for First in National Poster Competition

Charles W. Pemble IV, a fourth-year graduate student in the Center for Structural Biology at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, has finished in a tie for first place in the national student poster competition at the American Crystallographic Association meeting in Honolulu. His poster was prepared in conjunction with his mentor, Todd Lowther, Ph.D., assistant professor of biochemistry, and Steven J. Kridel, Ph.D., assistant professor of cancer biology. It described work he is doing to understand the crystal structures involved in aspects of an enzyme called human fatty acid synthase which is responsible for synthesis of long-chain fatty acids. These fatty acids are crucial in human physiology.

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Researchers Find New Biomarker for Fatal Prostate Cancer

New research findings out of Wake Forest University School of Medicine and the University of Wisconsin may help provide some direction for men diagnosed with prostate cancer about whether their cancer is likely to be life-threatening. In a study that appears in the February issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, researchers confirmed their earlier findings that men who have too much calcium in their bloodstreams subsequently have an increased risk of fatal prostate cancer. Now researchers have also identified an even more accurate biomarker of the fatal cancer: high levels of ionized serum calcium. “Scientists have known for many years that most prostate cancers are slow-growing and that many men will die with, rather than of, their prostate cancer,” said Gary G. Schwartz, Ph.D., senior author of the study and an associate professor of cancer biology at the School of Medicine, a part of Wake Forest

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Research Fellow Wins Prestigious Award

Lei Shi, M.D., Ph.D., a research fellow at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, has received the Marie Curie Award from the Radiation Research Society. The award honors a scholar-in-training showing the highest potential for a successful career in the areas of radiation, biology, chemistry, physics or medicine. As the winner, Shi will present the annual Marie Curie Award lecture at the 58th annual meeting of the Radiation Research Society in Philadelphia in November and will receive a cash award and travel expenses. Shi’s lecture will focus on his work in the laboratory of Judy Brunso-Bechtold, Ph.D., in the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, where scientists are working to learn more about radiation-induced brain injury. Whole-brain radiation is widely used for recurrent brain tumors as well as to prevent the metastasis of breast cancer, lung cancer and malignant melanoma to the brain.

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Anonymous Donor Gives $20 Million for Cancer Research at Wake Forest Baptist

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has received $20 million to study the effects of muscadine grape extract (MGE) on prostate and breast cancers. The gift by a donor who wishes to remain anonymous is the largest ever received by the Medical Center.

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Obesity Drug Helps Unlock Clues about Cancer

An approved drug for fighting obesity is helping scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine uncover clues about how to stop the growth of cancerous tumors. “Our discovery makes an exciting treatment target because theoretically you don’t have to worry about harming nearby healthy tissue,” said senior researcher Steven J. Kridel, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Cancer Biology. In the current issue of Cancer Research, Kridel and colleagues are the first to report that a tubular network within cells, known as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is regulated by an enzyme that is tightly linked to tumor growth and development.

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Drug that Mimics Vitamin D Hormone May Boost Effectiveness of Prostate Cancer Treatment, Report Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center Researchers

Drug that Mimics Vitamin D Hormone May Boost Effectiveness of Prostate Cancer Treatment, Report Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center Researchers

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Estate Gift of $2.8 Million Helps Fund Three Professorships in Cancer Research

A former Greensboro resident has helped fund three professorships in cancer research at the Comprehensive Cancer Center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The gift of $2.8 million from the estate of Doris Stormyr Anderson was combined with money from Wake Forest Baptist’s Discovery Fund to create the professorships. The Discovery Fund includes contributions from hundreds of donors who give in support of the Comprehensive Cancer Center each year.

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Scientists Identify Genetic Marker for Gastric Cancer Prognosis

Although immunotherapy is seen as a very promising treatment for cancer, currently only 20 to 30 percent of patients respond positively. Being able to identify the people most likely to benefit from the costly therapy is a Holy Grail for oncologists.

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Lab Mice Cured of Cancer after Receiving White Blood Cells from Cancer-Resistant Mice

Lab Mice Cured of Cancer after Receiving White Blood Cells from Cancer-Resistant Mice Lab Mice Cured of Cancer after Receiving White Blood Cells from Cancer-Resistant Mice WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - White blood cells from a strain of cancer-resistant mice cured advanced cancers in ordinary laboratory mice, researc

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